History Courses

All courses are 3 credit hours.

HIS 202. North Carolina History and Government
Examines the historical, economic, and political development of the state. Special emphasis is placed on the techniques, materials, resources, and strategies that may be employed in teaching similar subjects in elementary and secondary schools.

HIS 223. United States History to 1865
A survey course that examines the major social, political, economic, and cultural developments of the United States republic from the time of settlement to the Civil War. Explores how factors such as politics, race, class, religion, gender, and war have shaped the American experience. Key topics include European settlement, colonial development, the American Revolution and nation formation, continental expansion, and the crisis over slavery.

HIS 224. United States History since 1865
A survey course that examines the major social, political, economic, and cultural developments in American history from the end of the Civil War to the late twentieth century. Important topics include reconstruction, industrialization, “Progressive” reforms, mass consumerism and mass culture, prosperity and depression, the emergence of America as a world power, and the Cold War.

HIS 250. Introduction to Public History
An introduction to the field of public history geared especially to sophomores and juniors. Using as its model the “Best Practices” guidelines offered by the National Council for Public History, students will learn about the history of the field, issues in interpretation, and career possibilities for public historians. The course will briefly introduce important subfields in public history, such as museum studies, archives management, digital history, and historic site interpretation. Where possible, the instructor will involve students directly in a real-life public history project.

HIS 251. Public History Internship (on campus)
Introduces students to hands-on work in public history through on-campus collaboration with the Ramsey Center for Regional Studies and/or the Rural Life Museum. Students will work with on-campus professionals including the director of the Ramsey Center, Archivist for the Southern Appalachian Archives, and Director of the Rural Life Museum. Students will gain experience working on concrete projects related to public history, such as exhibition research, design, or installation, or archival preservation, cataloguing, or public service. Prerequisite to HIS 451.

HIS 261. Internship
An initial program of field work enabling students to explore new areas or to supplement regular courses. Department approval required.

HIS 292. World History to 1500
Examines the development of the major classical core civilizations and the major nomadic societies of the world. In addition to the rise and fall of these societies, the course emphasizes the first “global” civilization of early Islam, and the preponderant role of the Mongol empire on neighboring societies.

HIS 293. World History since 1500
A survey of modern history from a world perspective with emphases on the interaction of Western Civilization with the rest of the world, including the commercial revolution, slavery, imperialism, and the revolution against colonialism.

HIS 300. Advanced Topics in Public History
This course will offer students an opportunity to spend a semester learning in greater depth about a particular field in public history, such as museum studies, historic preservation, digital history, or historic site management. The course will be taught by an experienced professional in the specific field who will introduce students to the history of the field, current best practices, and contemporary debates, challenges, and opportunities. As much as possible the course will offer students hands-on experience working on a relevant project.

HIS 301. Modern Latin America
Examines the important political, economic and social issues and themes that have generally affected the history of twentieth-century Latin America.

HIS 303. Latin American Women
Examines the historical experiences of women in Latin America from pre-Hispanic times until the present through the theoretical lenses of race, class, and gender.

HIS 317. The United States Since 1945
Examines the political, social, cultural, economic, and diplomatic developments in American history in the half-century following the Second World War. Topics include the pervasive influence of the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, the Vietnam War, social protest movements and the rise of a counterculture, the impact of Watergate, conservative backlash, and the end of the Cold War.

HIS 320. The Ancient World
Covers the major civilizations of the Mesopotamian, Near Eastern, and Mediterranean worlds, beginning with the Sumerians and continuing as far as the birth of Islamic civilization. The course emphasizes historical method, using primary sources for conducting critical inquiries into ancient societies, religions, and cultures.

HIS 327. Special Topics: U.S. History
Options for students to study, according to their interests, a variety of topics not covered in regular courses. To be announced by the department.

HIS 328. Special Topics: World History
Options for students to study, according to their interests, a variety of topics not covered in regular courses. To be announced by the department.

HIS 329. Special Topics: World History
Options for students to study, according to their interests, a variety of topics not covered in regular courses. To be announced by the department.

HIS 330. Women in the American Experience
This course introduces students to the history of women by examining how the experiences, roles, and status of women have been shaped historically by race, class, geography, religion, and other social factors. Meets American Diversity Connector requirement.

HIS 338. Early Modern Europe
A survey of Europe emphasizing the interaction of ideas and social forces. Absolutism and aristocracy will be examined as factors leading to the Revolution of 1789. Leading personalities from Louis XIV to Napoleon will receive special emphasis.

HIS 340. Twentieth-Century Europe
The decline and rise of Europe from World War I to the era of detente. Emphasis on social and intellectual changes that reformed European society after World War II. Examines the rise of totalitarianism and social democracy through Hitler, Churchill, Brandt and others.

HIS 349. Appalachian Oral History
Examining people and the history of the region with major emphasis on the culture of the area. Meets American Diversity Connector requirement.

HIS 350. African American History
An introduction to the social, cultural, and political history of African Americans from the colonial era to the present.

HIS 391. Junior Seminar
Examines the theory, historiography, and methodology of the history discipline. Students complete a research, writing, and presentation portfolio that demonstrates their abilities to develop and apply the necessary skills for advanced undergraduate research. Students must pass this course with a grade of C or higher. This course is a prerequisite for the Senior Seminar, HIS 491.

HIS 402. History of Mexico
Surveys Mexican history from pre-Hispanic period to the present by examining political, economic, and social issues.

HIS 404. Pre-Hispanic and Colonial Latin America
This course examines the social, economic, political, and cultural history of pre-Hispanic and colonial Latin America.

HIS 415. Early America
This course examines the beginnings of U.S. society from 1450 through 1800, focusing on the period between the coming together of cultures in North America after contact with Europeans and the founding of the United States and establishment of the U.S. Constitution.

HIS 418. American Politics and Society, 1900-1945
This course examines the political, social, cultural, and economic developments in American history during the first half of the twentieth century. The vast array of significant topics and events include the impact of industrialization and urbanization, the Progressive Era, the Suffrage Movement, World War I at home, the emergence of mass culture and a mass consumer society, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the home front during World War II.

HIS 429. U.S. in the World Since 1900
Examines America’s role in the world from the “age of empire” of the late nineteenth century to new challenges that confront the U.S. at the dawn of the twenty-first century. The course will touch upon issues of national power, territorial acquisition, market penetration, ideological conflict, warfare, and diplomacy. Topics include the emergence of America as a world power, Wilsonian “internationalism,” the origins and consequences of World War II and the Cold War, and the collapse of communism.

HIS 430. U.S. Environmental History
Examines the relationships between Americans and their environments in the five hundred years since European-American contact, emphasizing how environments have shaped human history and vice versa.

HIS 437. Renaissance and Reformation
The Renaissance, the Reformation, and the development of modern states under absolutism.

HIS 441. Europe since 1789
This course investigates the major events of the modern European period from the French Revolution to the Great War with special emphasis on the Napoleonic Wars, the Industrial Revolution, and Imperialism.

HIS 451. Public History Internship (external)
Introduces students to a wide range of issues and experiences in the public history profession through hands-on experience at an operating public history site. Successful completion of the on-campus internship is a prerequisite for this course, which is designed as a capstone experience within the concentration.

HIS 452. History of Modern Japan
History of Japan from 1850 to the present, emphasizing the impact of Western imperialism on Japan’s traditional culture, the Meiji Restoration and modernization, the growth of militarism and World War II, and the emergence of Japan as an economic power in the postwar era, as well as the role of “soft power.” The course further highlights the significance of Japan’s unique relations with the U.S. during the period.

HIS 457. Directed Readings in U.S. History
Independent readings directed by members of the history faculty and approved by the department.

HIS 458. Directed Readings in World History
Independent readings directed by members of the history faculty.

HIS 459. Directed Readings in World History
Independent readings directed by members of the history faculty.

HIS 460. Independent Study
A directed program of reading and research open only to juniors and seniors with approval of the history faculty.

HIS 461. Internship
A program of field work open to juniors and seniors with approval of the history faculty.

HIS 491. Senior Seminar
The capstone course for the History Major. Students conduct original research, employing appropriate primary and secondary sources leading to completion of a written senior thesis. Additionally, students give a public presentation of their work.